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Aquatic Plants

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  1. Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'

    Acorus gramineus 'Ogon'

    Sweetflag, Golden dwarf

    This grassy-leaved sweet flag cultivar is a dwarf plant which looks like a grass or small iris, but is actually a member of the acorus family. It has insignificant flowers and is grown primarily as a ground cover or accent. Features iris-like tufts of narrow, grass-like, variegated leaf blades (6-12" tall and 1/4" wide) which are striped with yellow and green but primarily appear as yellow. Tufts slowly spread by creeping roots to form a dense ground cover. Foliage is sweetly fragrant. Inconspicuous, sedge-like flower spikes (with spadixes to 3" long) of tiny, densely-packed, greenish-yellow flowers appear in late spring to early summer. Flowers give way to tiny fleshy berries. Commonly called grassy-leaved sweet flag because of the aromatic, grass/iris-like foliage.
    $9.99
  2. Acorus gramineus 'Variegatus'

    Acorus gramineus 'Variegatus'

    Sweetflag, Variegated Grassy-leaved

    A. g. ‘Variegatus’ is commonly called variegated Japanese rush, dwarf sweet flag or grassy-leaved sweet flag. It is a semi-evergreen, marginal aquatic perennial that features grass- to iris-like tufts of narrow, variegated leaf blades (1/4” wide) which are striped with white and green and fan upward to 6-12” tall. It thrives in wet soils and is commonly grown in water gardens and boggy areas as a foliage accent or ground cover. Although it looks like a grass or small iris, it is actually a member of the acorus family. Insignificant, sedge-like flower spikes (2-3” long spadixes without showy spathes) are densely packed with tiny greenish flowers that bloom from late spring to early summer. Flowers give way to tiny fleshy berries. Tufts slowly spread by creeping roots to form a dense ground cover. Foliage is sweetly fragrant when bruised.
    $9.99
  3. Colocasia 'Royal Hawaiian Diamond Head'

    Colocasia 'Royal Hawaiian Diamond Head'

    Colocasia 'Diamond Head'

    A combination of large dark purple to black leaves with a spectacular glossy finish and a small circular-shaped dark burgundy colored ‘piko’ and semi-glossy dark burgundy colored petioles (stems). Height: 48” to 60”.
    $16.99
  4. Colocasia 'Royal Hawaiian Hawaiian Punch'

    Colocasia 'Royal Hawaiian Hawaiian Punch'

    Colocasia 'Hawaiian Punch'

    Fresh tropical green foliage with attractive red margin & red veins on underside of foliage, held on glossy red stems. 36 " x 36”.
    $16.99
  5. Colocasia 'Royal Hawaiian Maui Gold'

    Colocasia 'Royal Hawaiian Maui Gold'

    Colocasia 'Maui Gold'

    Textured chartreuse foliage held on ivory white stems. Foliage does not burn in high temperatures or full sun. Great companion for ‘Black Coral’. 48" x 36”.
    $16.99
  6. Colocasia esculenta var antiquorum 'Illustris'

    Colocasia esculenta var antiquorum 'Illustris'

    Colocasia 'Imperial Taro'

    The heart-shaped leaves of 'Illustris' are huge, and their dark highlights are stunning. This elephant ear is a lover of moist shade, but does best with a little dappled sunlight. It will tolerate boggy conditions.
    $14.99
  7. Crinum menehune

    Crinum menehune

    Bog Lily, Red

    A small growing bulbous perennial that forms clumps to about 24 inches tall with deep burgundy-red 1 to 2 inch wide leaves and large deep-pink flowers that rise on dark red stalks from early summer to fall. Unlike the larger more common red selections of Crinum procerum this plant's foliage does not fade and remains a deep red. Plant in full sun to light shade and irrigated occasionally to regularly - this plant can be grown in the pond margin and in water up to 6 inches above the crown but is surprisingly tolerant of drier conditions. Listed as hardy to USDA Zone 8. This plant, reportedly a cross between the large red-leaved Crinum amabile and a small Caribbean species with green leaves was introduced by Sean Callahan of the Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden on the big Island of Hawaii. The cultivar name for this plant has its origins in Hawaiian mythology that notes the Menehune as a secretive dark-skinned small race of people who live in the deep forests of the Hawaiian islands
    $26.99
  8. Cyperus alternifolius

    Cyperus alternifolius

    Umbrella Palm

    Umbrella plant or umbrella palm is a perennial sedge that features a grass-like clump of triangular green stems typically growing to 2-3’ tall. Each stem is topped by a whorl of 10-25 drooping leaf-like bracts that resemble the ribs of a raised umbrella.
    $29.99
  9. Cyperus alternifolius 'Gracilis'

    Cyperus alternifolius 'Gracilis'

    Umbrella Palm, Dwarf

    Smallest of the Umbrella Palms, the Dwarf Umbrella Palm grows only 18-24 inches tall with whorls of spiked foliage atop its slender but rigid green stems. It's very popular for smaller areas in bogs and planters, and grows well in sun and shade. Water depths should not exceed 3 inches.
    $19.99
  10. Dichromena colorata

    Dichromena colorata

    Star Grass

    White-tops, Star-rush, or White-topped Sedge is native to wet habitats, moist or wet fields, marshes, meadows, and swampsides and open, moist, wet habitats from Virginia south along the coastal plain throughout Florida and the Keys, west along the coastal plain and lowlands into Texas and the Lower Mississippi Valley in Arkansas. This is a short, upright sedge with drooping, thin leaves in a star-shaped cluster with a bold white center.
    $19.99
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Special thanks to Missouri Botanical Gardens, Walters Gardens and Wikipedia – for plant information and photos.