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  1. Abelia 'Edward Gaucher'

    Abelia 'Edward Goucher'

    Edward Goucher Abelia

    Beautiful, semi-evergreen shrub with gracefully arching branches. Features clusters of lavender-pink, funnel-shaped flowers (to 3/4" long) with orangish yellow throats. Flowers bloom from mid-summer into fall. Useful in a border planting, as a divider or informal hedge.
    $21.95
  2. Abelia x grandiflora

    Abelia x grandiflora

    Glossy Abelia

    This Abelia hybrid is a rounded, spreading, multi-stemmed shrub in the honeysuckle family . Rounded shrub with arching branches and purple-green winter foliage. Old fashioned shrub with an abundance of small, fragrant white flowers in summer. Attracts bees and butterflies. Deer resistant. This hybrid is a cross between A. chinensis and A. uniflora.
    $19.95
  3. Abelia x grandiflora 'Little Richard'

    Abelia x grandiflora 'Little Richard'

    Little Richard Abelia

    Very compact Abelia with glossy, vivid green foliage that takes on tangerine-pink tints in fall. Ideal for foundation planting under windows, the front of the shrub border or a low informal hedge plant. Evergreen or semi-deciduous where colder.
    $21.95
  4. Abelia x grandiflora 'Mardi Gras'

    Abelia x grandiflora 'Mardi Gras'

    Mardi Gras Abelia

    A festival of color splashes across the foliage of this compact semi-evergreen shrub. In spring, the new growth is tipped in bright pink which softens to a sparkling mound of creamy white and green leaves. In early summer, lightly fragrant shell pink flowers appear; these flowers dot the shrub extending its bloomtime from summer until early fall. Unlike many of the other variegated abelias, Abelia ‘Mardi Gras’ is a strong grower and is not prone to losing its variegation over time. Use it as an accent shrub to add a touch of unusual color to the landscape. Its fine foliage will set off the garden’s bolder leaved plants. Add it to perennial plantings to provide structure and background, or use it in container plantings.
    $29.95
  5. Abelia x grandiflora 'Rose Creek'

    Abelia x grandiflora 'Rose Creek'

    Rose Creek Abelia

    Lustrous leaves with a pinkish cast emerge on crimson stems, mature to dark green and turn purple-green in winter. Its compact size makes an excellent foundation, container or low hedge plant.
    $21.95
  6. Abies firma

    Abies firma

    Momi fir

    Conical, open evergreen tree with coarse needles. Able to withstand southern heat, poor drainage and resistant to Phytopthora root rot. Excellent conifer for part shade or intermittently wet soil.
    $199.99
  7. Acanthus mollis

    Acanthus mollis

    Bear's Breeches

    Winter hardy to USDA Zones 7-10 where it is easily grown in average, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Plants tolerate a wide range of soils except poorly-drained ones. Plants may not flower well in too much shade. Late spring frosts can impair or eliminate flowering for the year. Remove flowering stalks after bloom. In cold winter areas, plant foliage should be left in place over winter but removed in early spring as new foliage appears. Plants can spread aggressively by creeping rootstocks, particularly in loose soils. Unwanted spread can be addressed by root barriers. Plants generally spread less in the northern parts of their growing range.
    $14.99
  8. Acanthus mollis 'Whitewater'

    Acanthus mollis 'Whitewater'

    Bear's Breeches, Variegated

    Leaves with white shades look like waves of clean, clear water. Pink and cream flower stalks are showy and last throughout the entire summer. Make a statement in the border or shade garden with this bold selection. Winter hardy to USDA Zones 7-10 where it is easily grown in average, fertile, medium moisture, well-drained soils in full sun to part shade. Plants tolerate a wide range of soils except poorly-drained ones. Plants may not flower well in too much shade. Late spring frosts can impair or eliminate flowering for the year. Remove flowering stalks after bloom. In cold winter areas, plant foliage should be left in place over winter but removed in early spring as new foliage appears. Plants can spread aggressively by creeping rootstocks, particularly in loose soils. Unwanted spread can be addressed by root barriers. Plants generally spread less in the northern parts of their growing range.
    $19.99
  9. Acanthus spinosus

    Acanthus spinosus

    Bear's breeches, spiny

    Acanthus spinosus commonly called bear's breeches is a clump-forming perennial which is grown as much for its attractive foliage as for its architecturally bold flower spikes. Features pure white, snapdragon-like flowers enclosed (hooded and subtended) by spiny, reddish-purple bracts and arranged in vertical rows on substantial flower spikes which rise well above the foliage mound to 3-4' tall. Blooms from late spring into mid summer. Deeply-cut, arching, glossy green, spiny, thistle-like leaves (2-3' long) form an ornamental mound of long-stalked, basal foliage which usually remains attractive throughout the growing season.
    $14.99
  10. Acer buergerianum

    Acer buergerianum

    Maple, Trident

    Acer buergerianum commonly called trident maple or three-toothed maple is native to China, Korea and Japan. It is a small, rounded, deciduous tree that typically grows rather slowly to 20-30’. Triangular, three-lobed leaves (to 3.5” long) are glossy green above and pale green beneath. Variable but usually attractive fall color features shades of dark red and orange. Non-showy, greenish-yellow flowers bloom in spring (April-May). Samaras (to 1” long) mature in fall. Exfoliating bark will develop on mature trunks.
    $129.99
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Special thanks to Missouri Botanical Gardens, Walters Gardens and Wikipedia – for plant information and photos.